Getting started with Drupal development – without coding!


Sandy: Kevin has lots to talk about, so our speaker
is Kevin Paxman from IST, Client Services, and he would like it if you would hold your
questions until the end. So Kevin is going to tell us about Drupal
development without coding. Kevin:
Yes, thanks. So, yes I have a lot to get through, so I
apologize if I talk a little fast; I am trying desperately to get through something that
tested out at about 50 minutes yesterday. So getting started with Drupal development
without coding. So, just a quick, very quick, background into
what is Drupal: Drupal is the content management system that powers most of our University
websites. It’s a very complicated system, but it’s
also a very powerful system. A good place to get started with it, well,
you can do stuff through the GUI, the graphical user interface, without having to touch code
at all, which can be a real benefit. For getting started, work done in the GUI
can be exported and passed onto developers, themers, etc., if you need to enhance what
you’ve done, or if it’s just straight forward, can go straight on the site. It can indeed be unicorns and rainbows. So what are we going to do today? We are going to create an “animals” content
type for our “zoology” department, both of which are fake, so don’t bust me if I
get anything wrong about the animals; we’re going to populate it with some sample content,
we’re going to create a listing page with some filters, and we’re going to export
the work so that it can be done, headed off to a developer, or maybe just placed on another
site. So why do we use content types, instead of
just blobs of HTML? Lots of people come from an old school web
development background just love blobs of HTML, they let you do whatever you want, but
that’s kind of a problem, it doesn’t give you a task-based experience, doesn’t give
you role-based experience […] With content types we can let different people have different
access. We can tell people where exactly where to
go. If you need to create a contact, you go to
the contact content type, you don’t have to guess. User consistency of experience on the site,
so the phone number is always underneath the address, for example, and not sometimes one
spot and sometimes another, which you can get with blobs of HTML. The fact that it uses fields means that you
can pick and choose those fields and present your data in a number of different ways, which
is particularly handy for open data, [inaudible sound cutting out] choose and build their
own apps on top of your content. So I’ve got a lot to get through so we’re
just going to burn right through it. Somewhere here I have a web browser. So this is our test site, I’ve already logged
in, the very I’m sorry if I can’t zoom in too much more, or things start going off
screen and the authoring experience, if you’re having trouble seeing I recommend coming closer. The structure, the very first thing I’m
going to do is I’m going to add a taxonomy. This taxonomy is also known as vocabulary. And this one is going to be called class,
except it’s going to be spelt with a C in front. And that is our biological classification
and we always change the machine name as it is belonging to the University, and we will
also put in the word animals to identify that it belongs to our animals content type we
are creating. Now, every time I hit save it’s going to
take a couple seconds and I’m going to vamp really poorly. Class, you think the very next thing you do
have to do is add terms, and you can just start right there but then what we’re actually
going to do is configure a URL alias pattern so that all the classes that we add get a
proper path, so we will close that, taxonomy terms and the pattern is going to be, we’re
going to put everything about animals in an animals folder, we’re going to put the classes
in a class folder, and I’m going to move my mouse so you can see, and we’re just
going to use the term name as the term. So now we’re done, and we’re going to
go back and create a handful of terms to our class. The very first one, and I won’t try to pronounce
them because I will get it wrong. These are actual terms, according to Wikipedia
at least. Okay now that we’ve created our terms we
are going to go in and create a content type to hold everything. So, the structured content types, got to add
a content type, and we’re going to call it animals. Description, for animals, is information about
a specific animal which populates the animals listing page, I’m going to try to not go
back and fix typos. Now, again, we always change the machine readable
name, we always use UW for the university, as I said. CT means content type, it’s a convention
we have in the WCMS, and we’re going to change the title field from the default of
title to Common name. I’m going to make publishing not default
and I’m going to make it use our revision system. We’re going to turn off comments, we don’t
want people commenting on the animals. We want to turn off the menus, because we’re
going to build a listing page so we don’t need menus for this. We’re going to put in the XML site map,
so it shows up, and we’re going to save and add some fields. So we could have just hit save and that would
have saved our work, so far, and then we would have to go and hit add fields, so save add
fields is theoretically a time saver, but as I say, there we go. We’re going to get rid of the body field,
because we don’t need one for this particular content type. Drupal always creates a body field by default. And we’re going to add a bunch of fields. The first one we’re going to add is a fun
fact field, which is going to be a long text field. Hit save. I didn’t rename the machine name, technically,
we should always rename the machine names, but in the interest of time, I’m just going
to skip over that for the fields. So we’re going to make fun facts required,
we’re only going to make it two rows, and we are going to save. And we are going to add a bunch of fields
– we’re going to add our Wikipedia article field. That’s going to be a link. So this can be a good idea if you know people
are just going to cut and paste from Wikipedia, don’t let them. Give them, make them, and put in the link
to Wikipedia instead. Normally we’ll put help text in, but we’re
skipping over that in the interest of time as well. We’re going to give this a static title
so it’s always Wikipedia article, and we’re going to save settings. And we’re going to add another new field,
this one is going to be called Photo. You might be surprised to know that the photo
is an image, and we hit save. Now we’re going to make this an optional
field, we don’t have to have a photo, so what we’re going to do is add a default
photo if they don’t choose one, which I have prepared previously. So we’re not going to make it required,
because that would make that pointless. We’re going to set up a minimum resolution
of 100 by 100, for our demo we’re only going to ever use it at 100 by 100, so in general
practice you want your minimum resolution to be the highest size the picture will be,
so it never has to scale up, it always has to scale down, so you don’t end up with
jaggy pixelated pictures. We’re going to enable the alt field and
make it required, because pictures need alt fields and they need to be filled in, for
accessibility. We’re going to set up some files sources
to match what we do in the WCMS, we always have an IMCE, we always have remote URL, and
we always have autocomplete reference, and we always say that the autocomplete contains,
and yes all fields, and we always say that IMCE browser settings are full. We don’t touch any of the files settings. [Save settings] So next up we are going to
do link up that taxonomy we created earlier, that’s why we created that taxonomy first
because it is very difficult to link up something that doesn’t actually exist. Just for confusion sake, taxonomy here is
referred to as term reference. And we are going to make it autocomplete term
widget so people can just enter their own tags if the ones that they want aren’t in
the list. Now on the next screen it’s going to make
me pick my vocabulary. I am going to pick that one I created. And I’m going to make this required. Next thing we are going to do is add a handful
of fields that just collects some little pieces of information so we’re going to go for
the names of the young, that’s just going to be a text field, and we’re going to hit
save. This is why it timed out at very close to
45 minutes it seems. Hit default. Video transcript
Sandy: Kevin has lots to talk about, so our speaker
is Kevin Paxman from IST, Client Services, and he would like it if you would hold your
questions until the end. So Kevin is going to tell us about Drupal development without
coding. Kevin:
Yes, thanks. So, yes I have a lot to get through, so I apologize if I talk a little fast; I
am trying desperately to get through something that tested out at about 50 minutes yesterday.
So getting started with Drupal development without coding. So, just a quick, very quick, background into
what is Drupal: Drupal is the content management system that powers most of our University
websites. It’s a very complicated system, but it’s also a very powerful system. A good place to get started with it, well,
you can do stuff through the GUI, the graphical user interface, without having to touch code
at all, which can be a real benefit. For getting started, work done in the GUI can be exported
and passed onto developers, themers, etc., if you need to enhance what you’ve done,
or if it’s just straight forward, can go straight on the site. It can indeed be unicorns
and rainbows. So what are we going to do today? We are going
to create an “animals” content type for our “zoology” department, both of which
are fake, so don’t bust me if I get anything wrong about the animals; we’re going to
populate it with some sample content, we’re going to create a listing page with some filters,
and we’re going to export the work so that it can be done, headed off to a developer,
or maybe just placed on another site. So why do we use content types, instead of
just blobs of HTML? Lots of people come from an old school web development background just
love blobs of HTML, they let you do whatever you want, but that’s kind of a problem,
it doesn’t give you a task-based experience, doesn’t give you role-based experience […] With
content types we can let different people have different access. We can tell people
where exactly where to go. If you need to create a contact, you go to the contact content
type, you don’t have to guess. User consistency of experience on the site, so the phone number
is always underneath the address, for example, and not sometimes one spot and sometimes another,
which you can get with blobs of HTML. The fact that it uses fields means that you can
pick and choose those fields and present your data in a number of different ways, which
is particularly handy for open data, [inaudible sound cutting out] choose and build their
own apps on top of your content. So I’ve got a lot to get through so we’re
just going to burn right through it. Somewhere here I have a web browser. So this
is our test site, I’ve already logged in, the very I’m sorry if I can’t zoom in
too much more, or things start going off screen and the authoring experience, if you’re
having trouble seeing I recommend coming closer. The structure, the very first thing I’m
going to do is I’m going to add a taxonomy. This taxonomy is also known as vocabulary.
And this one is going to be called class, except it’s going to be spelt with a C in
front. And that is our biological classification and we always change the machine name as it
is belonging to the University, and we will also put in the word animals to identify that
it belongs to our animals content type we are creating. Now, every time I hit save it’s
going to take a couple seconds and I’m going to vamp really poorly. Class, you think the
very next thing you do have to do is add terms, and you can just start right there but then
what we’re actually going to do is configure a URL alias pattern so that all the classes
that we add get a proper path, so we will close that, taxonomy terms and the pattern
is going to be, we’re going to put everything about animals in an animals folder, we’re
going to put the classes in a class folder, and I’m going to move my mouse so you can
see, and we’re just going to use the term name as the term. So now we’re done, and
we’re going to go back and create a handful of terms to our class. The very first one,
and I won’t try to pronounce them because I will get it wrong. These are actual terms,
according to Wikipedia at least. Okay now that we’ve created our terms we
are going to go in and create a content type to hold everything. So, the structured content
types, got to add a content type, and we’re going to call it animals. Description, for
animals, is information about a specific animal which populates the animals listing page,
I’m going to try to not go back and fix typos. Now, again, we always change the machine
readable name, we always use UW for the university, as I said. CT means content type, it’s a
convention we have in the WCMS, and we’re going to change the title field from the default
of title to Common name. I’m going to make publishing not default and I’m going to
make it use our revision system. We’re going to turn off comments, we don’t want people
commenting on the animals. We want to turn off the menus, because we’re going to build
a listing page so we don’t need menus for this. We’re going to put in the XML site
map, so it shows up, and we’re going to save and add some fields. So we could have
just hit save and that would have saved our work, so far, and then we would have to go
and hit add fields, so save add fields is theoretically a time saver, but as I say,
there we go. We’re going to get rid of the body field, because we don’t need one for
this particular content type. Drupal always creates a body field by default. And we’re
going to add a bunch of fields. The first one we’re going to add is a fun fact field,
which is going to be a long text field. Hit save. I didn’t rename the machine name,
technically, we should always rename the machine names, but in the interest of time, I’m
just going to skip over that for the fields. So we’re going to make fun facts required,
we’re only going to make it two rows, and we are going to save. And we are going to
add a bunch of fields – we’re going to add our Wikipedia article field. That’s
going to be a link. So this can be a good idea if you know people are just going to
cut and paste from Wikipedia, don’t let them. Give them, make them, and put in the
link to Wikipedia instead. Normally we’ll put help text in, but we’re skipping over
that in the interest of time as well. We’re going to give this a static title so it’s
always Wikipedia article, and we’re going to save settings. And we’re going to add another new field,
this one is going to be called Photo. You might be surprised to know that the photo
is an image, and we hit save. Now we’re going to make this an optional field, we don’t
have to have a photo, so what we’re going to do is add a default photo if they don’t
choose one, which I have prepared previously. So we’re not going to make it required,
because that would make that pointless. We’re going to set up a minimum resolution of 100
by 100, for our demo we’re only going to ever use it at 100 by 100, so in general practice
you want your minimum resolution to be the highest size the picture will be, so it never
has to scale up, it always has to scale down, so you don’t end up with jaggy pixelated
pictures. We’re going to enable the alt field and make it required, because pictures
need alt fields and they need to be filled in, for accessibility. We’re going to set up some files sources
to match what we do in the WCMS, we always have an IMCE, we always have remote URL, and
we always have autocomplete reference, and we always say that the autocomplete contains,
and yes all fields, and we always say that IMCE browser settings are full. We don’t
touch any of the files settings. [Save settings] So next up we are going to do link up that
taxonomy we created earlier, that’s why we created that taxonomy first because it
is very difficult to link up something that doesn’t actually exist. Just for confusion
sake, taxonomy here is referred to as term reference. And we are going to make it autocomplete
term widget so people can just enter their own tags if the ones that they want aren’t
in the list. Now on the next screen it’s going to make me pick my vocabulary. I am
going to pick that one I created. And I’m going to make this required. Next thing we
are going to do is add a handful of fields that just collects some little pieces of information
so we’re going to go for the names of the young, that’s just going to be a text field,
and we’re going to hit save. This is why it timed out at very close to
45 minutes it seems. Hit default. [Sound cuts out]. [The field] is required now. Many animals
have more than one possible name for their young, so we’re just going to make this
an unlimited values. We’re going to create a handful more of very similar fieldsets [you
may have seen for the other ones], so we’ve got names for the female, which is also going
to be a text field, and we’re going to save it. We’re going to save it. We’re going to make that required and that
unlimited. Now we’re going to go into and we’re going
to add another field, names for the males, that’s also going to be a text field, Now what, obviously this took a lot of pre
planning to get it so that I could theoretically do this in 45 minutes. You won’t ever try
to create a content type in this much of a hurry, in your life, I hope. And unlimited, again. And we’re going to collect one more piece
of this type of data, we’re going to ask for the collective nouns, which is also going
to be a text field. Part of the reason it takes this long at this
point is because it’s creating data based on tables, where all of the fields go. That’s
required, and it’s unlimited, only two more fields to add. So, we are going to move away
from the text fields at least, and we’re going to find out if these animals are on
campus, and that’s just going to be a simple Boolean, which is a yes/no, and we’re going
to make it an on/off checkbox, because it’s going to be a yes/no. And, again, because
it’s a yes/no, we’re actually going to have to enter some values, to be saved and
I think I heard a guess from the audience that it’s going to be yes and no, and you’re
right. If you don’t set yes or no it’s actually going to say one or zero, which is
not very human readable. And we’re not going to make that required, because if we made
it required, then everything would have to be on campus Get the right set up. Another thing we’re
going to do, see by default right now it says yes we’re going to use the field label instead
of the on value, so that instead ticking a box that just says yes without any explanation,
it’s going to be a box that says on campus. The final field we’re going to add is a
location field, and we’re going to cheat a little here, with what we would normally
do with the location, just to keep to the “no coding” part of the demonstration.
So normally we have some code, which brings in the University locations as a pre-filled
dropdown box. We’re not going to have that in this instance because that would mean I
would have to go into the code; so instead, we’re going to cheat, and just collect the
name and the latitude and longitude and use that. There we go, so we’re not going to
collect the street locations, we’re going to default to Canada, and we’re going to
allow the co-ordinate chooser, and we’re going to make the marker be the University
marker. Location is not required because not everything has a location necessarily. So
that’s our content type created, at this point you could theoretically start entering
data, we’re going to do a few more things before I show you a run through of that, I’m
not sure I have to save a second time here but it makes me feel a whole lot better to
hit save a second time, just to be sure. So the next thing we’re going to do, we’re
going to make that location field not show up unless they’ve ticked yes, because we
don’t want to collect a location if they’re not on campus. So we’re going to our manage
dependencies here, and we’re going to say if the location is based on the on campus,
if the dependent field is visible, and it has a value of “On campus”. Alright, the
other thing we’re going to do is we’re going to set up a URL
for our content type, so that it goes in the right path. So that is under URL aliases;
there we go. And we’re going to go into the patterns, so this is the same screen we
got to from the taxonomy, we’re going to set it to the animals slash node title so
that’s just right in the root of animals. It’s a really good idea if you’re creating
content that you have everything be off the same path, again for that consistency of experience.
You don’t want slash animals slash animals dash listing, because that’s kind of confusing,
okay. And the other thing we’re going to do before
we start creating content is set up some permissions. So right now, again, I could start creating
content because I’m an administrator on the site, but no one else can, because we
haven’t set that permission up. The permission page in Drupal is very complex, or complicated
I guess, and we make it worse by having a whole bunch of roles, so it takes up quite
a bit of space, and quite a bit of depth, I’m going to just cheat and go straight
to the sections I know I need, there we go, so what we want to do is set up permissions
for creating content, we’re going to scroll over a bit, so this was animals, this is the
big reason as to why I didn’t want to zoom in very much, there’s administrator, okay,
now where’s the last one, animals down there, alright, so, we always make sure that the
permissions are set up that administrators, site managers, and WCMS support can do basically
anything, if you’re at all curious as to what permissions make sense, it’s a good
idea to maybe model them after the ones that are on our web page content type. So we let
content editors and authors edit things, edit any, we don’t let, lower permissions delete
any content at all, there’s some other permissions that we would normally set, but in the interest
of time, I’m going to sort of skim over them, and I’m just going to set them for
the administrator. So over right getting published options, we’re just going to go through
and, so again, normally, we would set this up, so that it matched, for example, web page
has, and then other thing we’re going to scroll down to is that taxonomy, there we
go, there’s our class taxonomy. So again, normally we’ve let people do more in short,
so. We let everybody add terms, but only the higher
ups get to actually delete terms. And save. So now we really are fully set up with our
content type, as soon as this page finishes saving I’m going to create some content. Now, because I’m going to create content
live, I’ve prepared a spreadsheet that I can cut and paste from. Any second, there
we go. So there’s our animals content type, so I’m going to create a goose, the fun
fact about the goose is over here, the Wikipedia article link is over here, and I’ve got
a remote URL for the image, and I will transfer it over. There we go, the alt text is: a goose
in a field, that’s close enough, and geese have a class which already have pre-populated,
there we go, geese are goslings, female is the goose, the male is the gander, and there
are a whole bunch of collective nouns: so they could be a flock, they could be a gaggle,
they could be a herd, they could be a skein, I’m going to hope is the pronunciation,
they can be a team, and they can even be a wedge, although if you look at Wikipedia that’s
only if they’re in the air. We’re going to say yes, we have geese on
campus, [audience laughs] we’re going to say they’re in EV2 which is the home of
our goose tracker, so and I’ve happened to looked up the latitude and longitude, I’m
sure you’ve all had the building latitude and longitude memorized. And we’re going
to publish this. So, now that my cut and paste is done, well I didn’t turn off the authorship
information, that’s the step I missed. So you can see here’s our page, we got our
fun fact, we’ve got our Wikipedia article, this is the default look, we’ve got our
location, there’s no fancy map here. We’re going to change a bunch of this: I’m
going to open in a new tab, so I can just come back to this, and go into content types,
and I’m going to go into our display options here, and we’re going to do somethings.
So we’re going to move the photo right up to the top, and we’re going to lose its
label, and we’re going to lose the label for the fun fact, the Wikipedia article, and
the location, we’re going to bring the label for the class inline, we’re going to bring
the label for the campus inline, we’re going to change the image to be that hundred by
hundred, and we’re actually going to link it in this case to the original file, so you
can actually click through the image to see it at full size, we’re going to turn off
the linking ability of the class, normally that would let you have a click through on
the class so you can see everything that’s tagged with that same term, we haven’t set
up that listing page really, it’s not very exciting because there’s only one, so, I’m
just going to turn that off, and we’re going to change location to be a map And when that saves. We’re going to go back, hit refresh here,
and you can see we’ve got everything exactly, and there’s our pretty little map. So now
we’re going to create the listing page, and I’m going to close my extra tab, let’s
see if I can manage to get this one fully step through. So we’re going to add a new
view, the view name is going to be “animals”, once again we would normally change the machine
name, I’m not, we’re going to show content type animals, sorted by title, we’re going
to create a page at the animals URL that we’ve sort of been prepping everything for, it’s
going to be in table format. We’re going to actually remember to create a menu at this
time, not like my run-throughs, and we’re going to include an RSS feed, which is your
lowest common denominator form of open data gives you at least something that feeds out.
And we’re going to put that in the animals folder, and we’re just going to call that
RSS.xml. Continue and edit. Alright, so here we have a view, and you can
see there is some extra content added by my colleague on the other side of the room, it’s
not very exciting right now, all it’s got is the title, so we’re going to change some
things, we’re going to limit this to animals, and we’re going to pick and choose which
fields we want. So we want the class, the collective noun, we don’t want the fun fact,
or the location, we want the name of the female, the name of the male, the name of the young,
whether or not it’s on campus, and the photo. And we’re going to configure those now,
most of them we’re just going to take the defaults, so classes. Class we want to be
just plain text cause of that listing page we haven’t created for those. Collective
nouns we’re just going to take default, names for females we’re going to take default;
names for male we’re going to take default; names for young we’re going to take default;
on campus we’re going to take default; photo we’re going to force it to be that thumbnail
size again, and we’re going to link it to the content this time, so if they click on
the image they go to the actual piece of content. And now, you can see, our listing page is
much more exciting. Now one of the things that Drupal does by
default is sort in descending alphabetical order, which doesn’t make a lot of sense
to me, so we’re going to change that to ascending. We also, because these got added
in alphabetical order, the order of the columns doesn’t make a lot of sense. So we’re
going to bring the photo up here, and we’re going to do the correct order of the young,
male, female, collective, on campus, and we’re going to, that should be [something]. Now we’re going to add the ability to filter
this content so people can search through it, so we’re going to add some filters,
we’re not going to add all the filters, again, in the interest of time. But, what
we’re going to do is add a filter for the name of the young. We’re also going to search
for the on campus field. So we’re going to expose the filter to let people change
it, we’re going to take out the machine name, which doesn’t make a lot of sense
to have in there. We’re going to make it “contains”, so they can just type part
of a name, they don’t have to get it all right, and we’re going to, on campus, we’re
going to expose it, we’re going to take the machine name out, and that should do it,
and now we have filters on top. One more thing we’re going to do in here,
in the advance settings, is we’re going to go into the Query settings and force it
to be distinct, so that if somebody searches for a term, that the search would match multiple
items but with the same item, for example, if I search for “kit” and I find “kit”
and “kitten” it’s only going to display it once, instead of once for kit and once
for kitten. The other thing we’re going to do while we’re here is play around with
the table a bit, so, I’m going to take the default classes off of it, because we don’t
need them for what we’re doing. I’m going to take this photo, and I’m going to put
it in the same column as the title, and just separate it with a break tag. So now we have that, and we’re just going
to go into the RSS feed, and we’re going to change it from using the default settings
to displaying full content. Alright, and then we’re going to save this. So, if I’ve
done this properly, and third time is the charm, when we go to the home page there should
be a link for animals. And there is. So this is that listing page we created. There it
is on the page, if I type in “kit” and hit apply it shows the cat, of course it’s
very hard to find pictures of cats on the internet [audience laughs] so there’s no
photos available for the cat [more audience laughs]. And this does have an RSS feed associated
with it. If we had more time I would display that in a block over here, I’m just going
to click through the RSS feed and we can see there’s a cat because it’s a filtered
page, if I take the filter off and click on the RSS feed I actually get everything. Now
we could spend a lot of time cleaning this up so it’s a lot more, or I could do something
about the fact the location doesn’t show up, things like that, but that’s not worth
our time right now. So we’ve actually done the meat of it, we
have a content type, we have a listing page, now we’re ready to put it on our real site,
because you certainly never develop on your live site. So we’re going to go into our
structure and features, features is a Drupal thing that, lets us explore what we worked
on in the GUI, the code, so that you can hand it, just put it on the other site and turn
it on, if what you’ve done is okay, or you can hand it off to a themer or a developer
if you need some functionality added or to make it look prettier. So this name is surprisingly
enough, animals. We are going to change the machine name, even though we’re short on
time, because it’s very hard to change a features machine name after the fact. Description
is content type and information about animals, we’re going to go ahead and put it in the
uWaterloo content types package, so that it bundles with all the other content types we
have, and we’re going to be really generous about the work and call it version one. But
we are going to call it alpha. And now we’re just going to search for animals here, and
we’re going to add all the things we configured about animals. This is why consistent naming
is great, unless if you use the search and we named them all different things the search
would be more awkward. So we’re going to bring in the node, we’re going to bring
in the content types; you see it starts auto-detecting some things. We never featurize comments,
we don’t need to featurize the menu links, because that comes elsewhere, we featurize
every single one of these permissions, we don’t featurize the Schema.org mappings
unless you’ve actually configure them, which we didn’t, we featurized all of these variables,
and we make absolutely sure we get that view which is our listing page. And then we would
just download the feature. And normally at this point I hit save and I go to the server,
I extract it. But I’m going to hit cancel and open this oven which I’ve prepared with
content earlier. So here we have our “live” site, you’ll notice there’s no animals
menu item, if I go to add content, animals is missing, so I’m just going to go into,
I’ve already put the feature in place here, this is one that I’ve prepared earlier,
so it’s probably slightly different, so there’s our animals content type. It conflicts
with something that’s not turned on, so that doesn’t matter. Hit save, and I’ll
close this other window. And when this is done, through the magic of computers, we will
have everything we will need except for the content. Normally you don’t create all the
content when you’re testing, because it’s really awkward to try and move it over after
the fact. And this is making me vamp far longer than I wanted to. Does anyone have any jokes?
[audience laughs]. So because this was a feature, it’s now
doing all the stuff that we did manually, automatically, so it’s creating all the
database tables, it’s, making all the settings that we needed, please don’t let [inaudible]. Question from audience:
Can you export all the data if you want to [inaudible]. Kevin:
There are certain things that let you export data, it’s safest if you’re going from
bare site to bare site, it can be somewhat dangerous if you’re going from bare site
to populated site, because of all the automated, term ID’s the, what’s the, the primary
keys in the database, the numbers are the same so it may get confused. There, we go, now if we go into content types
we see it’s on. If we go to our homepage there’s our animals, if we go to “Add
content” there’s our animals, and we can create content and then we would have our
listing page. It’s not very exciting right now, because we haven’t entered any content,
this is something you can do in the view settings, and if we had more time we could put up a
message when there is no content that matches what we can search for. So that. So we’re done. Now, as I’ve sort of said
before, there’s still some final fires to put out, like we want that message that says
there is no content here. If they search for “koompk” then it’s got to say something,
it shouldn’t just give them a blank screen. But, that’s the gist of it. So if you want to try this for yourself, you
need a Drupal site where you have system administrator access. This is higher access than we give
out on pilots sites, on production sites, on training sites. So we can get you a WCMS
development site, send in a request at [email protected], or you can set up a development environment
of your own however you like. Maybe on your own machine. If you want to go further, we have Friday
morning sessions in EC2, which is “the Blackberry buildings”, our new home, where we talk
about Drupal and watch some Drupal training videos quite often. We in the WCMS have some,
a bunch, of Drupal books we have access to Drupalize me training videos. The Lynda.com
videos, which are available online, all faculty, staff, grad students have some Drupal stuff.
If you search for Drupal on the web you will get millions of results for varying versions
of Drupal. There’s DrupalCons, which are local get-togethers; DrupalCamps which are
big, annual, semi-annual conferences. They also, DupalCons and DrupalCamps have a big
tendency to put their videos online after they’ve hosted, so there’s another great
video source. So that’s it. Any questions? How did I do?
Holy crap, we went through that fast. Questions? Yeah. Audience member:
How different is that environment you were just working with from a stock Drupal. Kevin:
That’s a good question, so we’ve turned on some things, like that is stock WCMS, as
opposed to stock Drupal. So I didn’t add anything that isn’t already in our profile.
Things like views that’s not a part of stock Drupal, but pretty much everybody who runs
Drupal ends up turning on views because it’s so useful. I think the link field isn’t
there by default, there’s a few other things that aren’t there, that are absolute bare
bones Drupal, but, those are the ones I used today, it would be something that pretty much
every Drupal developer ends up turning on. Anything else? Alright. Sandy:
Thank you very much, Kevin. [Claps]. Member of audience: Is there a way of seeing
what other contents types [inaudible], can you see what other people have done Kevin:
So yeah, sort of. Something you can do is go to git.uwaterloo.ca/public, I believe.
Which, let’s you show what people have made public. We have a group here for the WCMS,
we’re going to make all our projects public so you can see what our project list is, see
things we’ve done. If you’re looking to add functionality there’s almost always a module for that.

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